Green Teen

We have all heard by now about the harmful chemicals in cosmetics but for teens some chemicals are more toxic than others here’s why. Cosmetic products with ingredients that contain estrogenic chemicals are endocrine disruptors. An endocrine disruptor is a synthetic chemical that when absorbed into the body either mimics or blocks hormones and disrupts the body’s normal functions. They alter normal hormone levels, halting or stimulating the production of hormones, or changing the way hormones travel through the body, thus affecting the functions that these hormones control.

In a study released in April 2010, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine looked at girls younger than 10 with early onset puberty and discovered a high incidence of endocrine disruptors that are found in some nail polishes and other cosmetics. The EWG was not simply curious about the number of products teen girls use today; they were more interested in the effects of these products. First of all, they found that the average teen girl uses nearly 50 percent more products daily than the average adult woman (17 vs. 12). Second of all, they found that, because of this enhanced product usage, the average teen girl has approximately 13 endocrine disrupters in her body.

Wait! There’s more. Because the teen years are when a girl’s body is maturing and hormones are all a fluster, there is no worse time for her to be plaguing her body with endocrine disrupters. The same goes for boys. So not only are teens exposing themselves to huge numbers of disrupters, they are also more susceptible to the effects. Oh no! Here are my top five chemicals teen should avoid.

The Filthy Five

1.     Parabens–hormone disruptor –found in 99% of cosmetics

2.     Fragrance–hormone disruptor–found in a vast majority of cosmetics

        Including skin care, body care, makeup and hair care

3.     Triclosan–hormone disruptor–body care, skin care, oral care

4.     Tolume–hormone disruptor–nail polish

5.     Oxybenzone–hormone disruptor–sunscreen, skin care, lip balms

 

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